Mines of El Dorado County

Mines of El Dorado County: “M” (Part 2)

The Miller mine was a chromite mine located one and one-half miles northwest of the town of Clarksville, near the Walker and Joerger mines. The deposit consisted of small amounts of layered chromite, however, there are no separate production records for this mine, since ore from these three mines was probably combined.

Also on the Mother Lode, two miles south of Placerville, was another Miller mine, the Miller (Ribbon Rock) mine. It was active from 1888 to 1894 and again in 1900. A ribbon-like vein of gold- bearing quartz, varying in width from two to five feet was developed by a 400-foot inclined shaft.

A third and fourth Miller mine were placer gold mines. One was near the gold rush town of Salmon Falls, the other was on the South Fork of the American River about six miles upriver from the City of Folsom. Both mines are now under Folsom Lake.

The Milo S. Jeffers mine was a placer gold claim of 160 acres two miles southeast of Smith Flat.

The Minerva mine was a 8.762 acre lode gold mine on the Mother Lode two miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Minnehaha mine was a 7.78 acre lode gold mine on the Mother Lode three miles south of the town of El Dorado. In 1900 eight men were employed and the ore was being crushed with a four-stamp mill.

The Mississippi mine was a placer gold, drift mine one and one-half miles east of Volcanoville. It was active around 1894 when an ancient river channel deposit was developed by a 240-foot adit.

The Missouri mine was a 45.05 acre placer gold mine two mile east of Volcanoville in Missouri Canyon.

The Mitchell mine was a lode gold mine located two miles northwest of Pine Hill (Pine Hill is the hill at the north end of Cameron Park – elevation around 2000 feet). A 150-foot adit was used to develop a four to ten-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz.

The Mocettini mine was a manganese mine located two and one-half miles east of Latrobe. The deposit, which was developed by open cut, contained greenstone stained with black manganese and iron oxides.

The Mohawk mine was a lode gold claim three miles south the the town of El Dorado on the Mother Lode. It was worked together with three other mines, all three totaling 61.63 acres.

The Molkey mine was a hydraulic mine one mile southeast of Fair Play. An ancient river channel containing a lot of clay was mined for its gold.

The Molybdenite Group operated a lode gold claim three miles northeast of Fair Play.

The Monarch Consolidated mine was a 137.38 acre lode gold mine on the Mother Lode consisting of a group of seven claims one-half mile east of Nashville.

The Monarch-Sugar Loaf mine was an isolated lode gold mine located three miles northwest of the town of Nashville on about 20 acres. Originally worked in the 1850s, it was again active between 1870 and 1907 when the ore was treated in a ten stamp mill. Some prospecting was done in the 1930’s and during 1953 and ’54, when the mine was leased to J. H. Wren and Associates of Sacramento, some rehabilitation work was done. Early in 1955 George Ross and Associates leased the mine and took some high-grade ore from small pockets in the deposit of gold-bearing quartz. Near the surface the gold is in small but rich ore shoots. Deeper, the gold, accompanied by sulfides, pyrite and galena (lead ore), was found in areas where the vein swelled, changed in direction or functioned with small stringers. The deposit was originally developed by open cuts and shallow shafts over a surface distance of some 2000 feet. In 1955 three men worked the center of the deposit through a 70-foot crosscut adit, treating the mined ore by hand-sorting, hand-mortaring (crushing) and amalgamation (combining gold with mercury for later separation).

The Monitor mine was a lode gold mine on 17.258 acres of the Mother Lode just south of Nashville. It was worked through a shaft 50 feet deep with a 50-foot drift at the bottom. In 1900 the rock was bringing $6 per ton.

Just north of the town of Nashville and just east of the Cosumnes River, was the Montezuma-Apex and Montezuma Extension mines. There are pages and pages of records on this very large mine, which is only summarized here:
These lode gold mines on the Mother Lode were originally worked at shallow depths during the early days of the gold rush and even up until 1871. They were again worked from 1890 to 1907 and later in 1914. There was some recorded output of ore during the years from 1920 until 1928. In 1931 the mines were reopened by Nashville Mines, Ltd., who were succeeded by the Montezuma-Apex Mining Company in 1933. Up until 1939 they operated it and the Nashville (Havillah) mine some 1000 feet to the south. The Montezuma-Apex Mine and the extension, were developed by a 1540-foot inclined shaft and an older 360-foot inclined shaft some 300 feet to the north. In the old workings of the mine, an ore body eight to 20 feet wide was stoped for a length of 250 feet down to the 120-foot level. In the newer workings a 150-foot long ore shoot was mined between the 800 and 1000-foot levels around the year 1914 by the California Exploration Company which leased the mine. In 1932 the shaft was deepened and another ore shoot was 570 feet long by four to eight feet wide was worked at the 1200-foot level. Little mining was done below the depth of 1225 feet since from there the ore decreased in grade. At one point, the 1500-foot level was extended 1050 feet to the south under the Nashville Mine in an attempt to encounter the Nashville (Havillah) vein. The ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill that was replaced in 1933 with a 240-ton mill equipped with two Marcy ball mills, hydraulic traps, Wilfely tables and a ten-cell floatation unit which concentrated the gold.

Two miles northeast of Newtown was the Mooney mine, a placer gold, drift mine. It was only active from 1894-96.

The Mooney Flat mine was a placer gold mine on 40 acres one mile south of Cool, near Knickerbocker Creek.

The Morey (Humbug) mine was a lode gold mine one mile west of Grizzly Flat. It was active intermittently from 1919-44. Small veins of gold-bearing quartz contained small deposits of high-grade ore, which was removed by sinking numerous shallow shafts. The ore was treated in a small mill on the property.

Four miles northwest of the town of Rescue was the Mormon Hill mine, a lode gold mine. It was active in 1934 and from 1938-41. A two to three foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 110-foot inclined shaft with 80 feet of drifts on the 100-foot level. The ore was treated in a five-stamp mill.

The Morning Star was a group of seam gold mines in a seam belt, one mile northeast of Georgetown. The mines were active around 1926 when about $75,000 in gold was recovered.

The Morris Consolidated mine was a 640 acre placer gold mine one mile east of Volcanoville.

Three miles east of Latrobe, on the west side of a large serpentine body, was a lode gold mine known as the Morse mine. All that is know is that it was active prior to 1894.

The Mount Gregory mine was a hydraulic mine three miles east of Volcanoville. It was active in 1896 and 1912 when a 20 to 25-foot bank with eight feet of cemented gravel was mined.

The Mount Hope mine was a 28.76 acre lode gold claim three miles north of Grizzly Flat on the north side of the North Fork of the Cosumnes River. It was active prior to 1888 when a vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 1000-foot adit and 100 and 200-foot shafts. The ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill.

A second Mount Hope mine was a placer gold claim one mile north of Volcanoville.

A third Mount Hope mine was a 20.64 acre lode gold mine two miles north of Garden Valley on the east branch of the Mother Lode.

Near the Morey mine, one mile west of Grizzly Flat, was the Mount Pleasant mine, a lode gold mine on 50.08 acres. The principal source of gold in the Grizzly Flat district, it was first worked in 1851, during the early days of the Gold Rush. From 1874 to 1914 some $1,046,748 worth of gold was removed. After 1914 only some small prospecting was done on the property and nothing was apparently done after 1941. The deposit consists of a belt of nearly parallel quartz veins around 300 feet wide. Within the quartz was found free gold, pyrite, galena and other ores. The gold alone, between the years 1881 and 1887, averaged $14 per ton. One of the larger veins, the Earle vein, was developed by a 1065-foot shaft with levels at 100-foot intervals. Drifts, of which there are 9000 feet, range from 300 to 1300 feet in length, with most of the work above the 850-foot level. There are also two other shafts 300 to 600 feet deep. The ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill that burned down in 1926.

The Mountain Qual mine was an 18.03 acre lode gold mine three miles northeast of Fair Play on the north side of the Middle Fork of the Cosumnes River. It was worked together with three other miles.

The Mulvey Point mine was an 80 acre placer gold mine two miles north of Georgetown near Bottle Hill.

The Muntz mine was a lode gold mine on the west branch of the Mother Lode three miles northwest of Greenwood near the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Murderer’s Bar mine was a placer gold mine on 39.53 acres two miles north of Cool on the Middle Fork of the American River.

Two miles to the southeast of Latrobe was a chromite mine known as the Murphy mine. During World War I, some 3000 tons of ore from this deposit was milled. In 1942, during World War II, the Volo Mining Company removed another 3000 tons of ore. During the first half of 1953 Edward Hadsel and Jerry Grant sub-leased the mine from the El Dorado Chrome Company and for a few months, produced about 100 tons of 14 percent chromite ore per day, using a crew of eight people. The property was developed by two open pits, the larger one being 200 feet long, 10 to 30 feet wide and 25 feet deep at the northern end. The ore was drilled with jack-hammers and then trucked 16 miles to the El Dorado Chrome Company mill near the Church gold mine (Union mine), south of the townsite of El Dorado.

A second Murphy mine was a placer gold mine on the South Fork of the American River about six miles down river from Lotus.

The Murray mine was a 20 acres placer gold mine one-half mile west of Indian Diggings.

One mile west of Volcanoville, on Buckeye Point, was a placer gold, drift mine known as the Murzo (Brass) mine. It was active around 1894 when a 150-foot adit was driven into the ancient gravel deposit which lay on slate bedrock.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “N”

The Nail mine was a lode gold mine three miles northeast of Fair Play near the heavily mined Slug Gulch area.

The Nancy Lee mine was a lode gold mine on the western branch of the Mother Lode, one mile northeast of Garden Valley on the west side of Greenwood Road.

The Nashville (Havillah, Tennessee-Nashville and several extensions of these) mine was actually a group of lode gold mines on the Mother Lode at Nashville, near Highway 49, about two miles north of the Amador County line. Consisting of two claims of 27.71 and 20.29 acres, it is said by some to be the first quartz workings in California, while others say the first in El Dorado County. This mine was first worked in 1851 and produced some $150,000 in gold from shallow workings. From 1868-71 and again around 1880 significant development work was done at the mine and around 1894 a 20-stamp mill was erected to treat the ore. From 1903-06 the mine was reactivated and from 1934 to 1936 the mine was worked by the Montezuma-Apex Mining Company, who also worked the Montezuma-Apex mine about 1000 feet to the north. The vein of gold-bearing quartz varied in width from five to twenty feet and was assayed in the 1930s at five dollars of gold per ton of ore. The mine was developed by a 1200-foot inclined shaft with levels at each 100 feet. At the 1200 foot level it was connected with the Montezuma mine 1000 feet to the north. The last work done in the mine was at the 200-foot level, south of the shaft and the 1000-foot level, north of the shaft. At the 1000-foot level an ore shoot eighty feet long and six to fifteen feet wide was mined.

The National Gold Ore Co. operated several placer mines in three different sections of land about two miles west of Volcanoville on the Middle Fork of the American River.

The famous Natomas Co., which ran huge dredges all through the greater Sacramento area, had a placer mining operation in El Dorado County,  three miles northeast of Salmon Falls on the North Fork of the American River.

The Negro Flat mine was a placer gold mine consisting of 160 acres three miles due east of Smith Flat and adjacent to the former railroad from Placerville to Camino. The name of this mine and the following mine may be different names for the same mine.

The Negro Hill mine was a placer gold mine that was in operation many years ago. It was located three miles to the northeast of Placerville at Negro Hill. The deposit of gold-bearing, ancient river gravel at this location was mined by drifting and hydraulicking.

The Nelson Dredge was a dragline dredge operated near Shingle Springs in 1946. The operator was one R.N. Nelson from Sacramento.

The New Chance lode gold mine and New Chance Mine and Mill site were located adjacent to each other two miles south of Shingle Springs on French Creek.

Two and one-half mines north of Greenwood was the New Eldorado (New El Dorado) mine, a lode gold mine on the western branch of the Mother Lode. It was active around 1894 and produced specimen gold (gold that was more valuable when left as mined, rather than being melted into bullion). It was developed by an adit of unreported length.

The New England mine was a lode gold mine one mile north of Georgetown on the east branch of the Mother Lode.

The New Era mine was a lode gold mine on 11.25 acres of the Mother Lode, one and one-half miles northwest of Placerville.

One-half  mile northwest of Greenwood on the western branch of the Mother Lode was a seam gold mile known as the New Garibaldi. The deeply weathered vein of gold-bearing quartz was up to eight-feet wide and about 400-feet in length. It was developed by a 170-foot crosscut adit and shallow shafts. The ore was treated on-site in a 25-ton Kinkaid mill.

The New Petaluma mine was a lode gold mine on 8.873 acres of the Mother Lode, two miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Nicola Fosatti mine was a placer gold claim on 89 acres, one mile due south of Camino just north of Weber Creek.

The Niles Reinhold mine was a placer gold mine five miles south of Pilot Hill on Weber Creek, about one-half mile above its convergence with the South Fork of the American River.

The No. 2 (Edmunds) Mine was a lode gold mine located one mine northwest of the town of Rescue. It was only active for a short time in 1938 when 100 tons of ore was mined. The deposit consisted of a two-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz that contained high-grade gold in pockets.

The Noble mine was a placer mine on 184.77 acres in an isolated location two miles east of Georgetown, just southeast of Hotchkiss Hill.

The Noble Electric Steel Company operated a chrome mill one mile southwest of Salmon Falls during World War I. The ore from several local chromium mines was crushed, fine-ground and concentrated on Wilfley tables and a Senn concentrator, before being sent to a smelter.

The Nonpareil Quartz and Gravel Mining Co. had a placer gold operation on 115 acres that was located two miles southwest of Fair Play and two miles northeast of Mt. Aukum.

Four miles south of the township of El Dorado and one-half mile east of the Mother Lode was a copper mine known as the Noonday mine. In 1900 it was described as having a 15 foot shaft and several open cuts. It became highly active from 1900-05, when to the shallow workings was added a shaft 200 feet deep with several hundred feet of drifts. In 1953 the mine was leased from Placerville businessman George Fausel by the Noonday Copper Mining Company. This company rehabilitated the shaft and added about 100 feet of new drifts. Ultimately, the shaft would reach 230 feet with working levels at 100 and 200 feet, and 350 feet of drifts. The mine was shut down in 1954 and then reopened for a short time in 1956 when five men were employed to do the mining. The seven-foot wide vein of iron and copper sulfides contained from five to nine percent copper (some pockets as high as 25 percent) with some silver and gold, when mined in the early part of the 20th century. During its last years of operation, the copper content in the ore dropped to four percent or less. Much of the ore was treated at the Volo mill, which was located at the Shaw mine, four miles west of Placerville and just north of today’s Highway 50.

Northerly’s 5-cent Hill mine was a placer mine on about 100 acres of land in an isolated location about two miles northwest of Greenwood.

The North Extension mine was a lode gold mine on 20.656 acres one mile northwest of Grizzly Flat. This area has a continuous line of mines for about four miles along a major group of quartz veins trending from the southwest to the northeast. If this mine was an extension of another mine, that is not noted in the records.

The North Extension of the Montezuma mine was a lode gold mine on 8.358 acres of the Mother Lode one mile north of Nashville on the north side of the North Fork of the Cosumnes River.

The North Extension of the Rocky Bend mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode two miles south of Garden Valley.

The North St. Lawrence mine was lode gold mine on the Mother Lode one mile southeast of Garden Valley.

The North Star mine was a lode gold mine on 20.65 acres located one and one-half miles northeast of Shingle Springs and two and one-half miles due west of the town of El Dorado.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “O”

The Oak mine was a lode gold mine located one mile northeast of Omo Ranch. I was active in 1894 when a one to four-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz in granite was developed by a two adits, one 400 feet in length and the other 150 feet in length. The ore was treated on-site in a five-stamp mill. Later three different mines at this location: the Black Oak, Crown Point and August, would become the Oak Consolidated mine. Together they totaled 30.92 acres.

Another Oak mine was a placer gold mine located one-half mile north of Omo Ranch.

The Oakland (formerly McNulty) mine was a lode gold mine about four miles south of the town of El Dorado on the Mother Lode. By 1890 the vein, which has an average thickness of four and one-half feet, had been opened to a depth of 450 feet. At that time work was in progress to continue down an additional 350 feet. The ore was crushed with a ten stamp mill. Several Pelton (water) wheels were used to provide power for driving and pumping.

The Oakland Consolidated mine was a lode gold mine consisting of two adjacent locations, the Oakland and Machine, one-half mile northwest of Greenwood on the western branch of the Mother Lode

The O’Brien (S-Bend) mine was a chromite mine located two miles north of Coloma, west of Perry Creek (not to be confused with the Perry Creek near Fair Play, in the southern part of the county). It was active in 1918, during World War I, and again in 1942, during World War II, when there was a critical need for chromium. In 1918 several hundred tons of ore were produced and in 1942, over 3000 tons was produced and then treated at the Volo Mill, west of Placerville. The mine was developed by two adits and a “glory hole” (large open pit created by mining from the bottom).

The O’Brien and Tulley mine was a placer gold mine adjacent to the town of Newtown.

The Ogle mine was a chromite mine one mile south of Volcanoville. Like many of El Dorado County’s chromite mines it was active for one year, 1917, when 47 tons of 45 percent ore was produced from an open cut.

A second Ogle mine was a placer gold mine one-half mile northeast of Volcanoville,  a short distance away from the previous one .

One mile east (north in some descriptions) of Greenwood on 18 acres of the western branch of the Mother Lode was the Ohio (Eagle) mine, a lode gold mine. It was active in 1894-96 when a four-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 250-foot inclined shaft.

Another lode gold mine with the name the Ohio mine was located one and one-half miles southwest of Grizzly Flat. It was active prior to 1894 when a four-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 135-foot vertical shaft and an inclined shaft of unknown depth. The ore averaged 12 dollars of gold per ton.

A third Ohio mine was a placer gold mine three miles south of Coloma in Gold Hill.

The Ohio Tunnel Co. operated a placer gold mine on 60 acres one and one-half miles north of Smith Flat.

The Old Abe mine was a lode gold mine three miles south of the town of El Dorado on the Mother Lode.

The Old Empire mine was a placer gold mine on 30.12 acres at Henry’s Diggings, one and one-half miles north of Omo Ranch. Nothing more is known about it.

The Old German mine was a placer gold mine one mile north of Indian Diggings.

The Old Gold mine was a lode gold claim one-half mine north of Greenwood on the west branch of the Mother Lode.

The Old Harmon mine, a part of the Harmon Group of gold mines, was a lode gold mine in the northern part of Placerville.

The Old Henderson and Fryer mine was a placer gold mine on 80 acres one and one-half miles north of Smith Flat.

The Old Hickory mine was a lode gold mine one mile south of Kelsey on 16.69 acres of the Mother Lode.

The Old Jasper mine was a lode gold mine nine miles northwest of Shingle Springs. It was active prior to 1896 when two parallel veins of gold-bearing quartz were developed by a 200-foot drift adit and an inclined shaft.

The Old Judge mine was a lode gold mine on 40 acres of the Mother Lode, one and one-half miles north of Kelsey, near Spanish Flat.

The Old Moore mine was a lode gold mine three miles north of Cool in a somewhat isolated location with three other mines.

The Old Quartz mine was a lode gold mine two miles south of the town of El Dorado on the Mother Lode.

The Old Wheeler mine was a placer gold mine on 80 acres adjacent in Grizzly Flat.

The Olds mine was a lode gold mile on 10.95 acres of the Mother Lode, one and one-half miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Olive mine was a lode gold mine on 40 acres of the western branch of the Mother Lode at Greenwood.

The Oliver mine was a lode gold mine one-half mile north of Greenwood on 20.40 acres of the western branch of the Mother Lode.

The Olsen and Baxter mine was a placer gold mine on 40 acres one mile east of Rescue near the intersection of Green Valley and Lotus roads.

The Olsen and Donaldson mine was a placer gold mine on 60 acres one-half mile southwest of Camino.

The Omo mine was a lode gold mine located one mile northeast of Omo Ranch. A one and one-half to three-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 150-foot adit and a 64-foot shaft. The ore was treated in a 125-foot flume with riffles made of poles.

The One Spot (Sailor Jack) mine was a placer gold, drift mine one mile south of Camino. It was active in the “early days”, when $40,000 of gold was produced, and reactivated in 1934-38. Two channels of ancient routes of the South Fork of the American River, one above the other, were developed by a 500-foot adit with drifts and raises. The mined gravel yielded up to $8 per cubic yard.

One mile north of Placerville was the One to Sixteen and Vulture mine. Nothing more is known about it.

The Onion Creek mine was an isolated placer gold mine on 160 acres 17 miles east of Georgetown, nine miles north of Pollock Pines and two miles east of Lookout Mountain. Located on Onion Creek, a tributary of Silver Creek, it is the most northeastern mine on the western slope of El Dorado County. Union Valley was at one time known as Onion Valley

The Ontario lodes mine was located on 26.086 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile southeast of Nashville.

The Ophir Quartz mine was a lode gold mine on 13.7 acres of the Mother Lode, two miles south of the townsite of El Dorado. The fourteen inch wide vein, with numerous stringers, was developed by an adit and a shaft, following the vein for 98 feet. The ore, some of which was high-grade, was crushed on-site in a two-stamp mill.

The Oregon mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode one-half mile south of Placerville.

The Oregon Hill and Columbia Tunnel mine was a placer gold mine on 29.38 acres one-half mile south of Placerville, adjacent to a large group of lode gold mines along the Mother Lode.

The Ori mine was a placer gold mine on 20 acres one mile west of Gold Hill on the south side of Thompson Hill.

A Placerville company known as the Orloma Company, operated a one and one-quarter cubic yard dragline dredge and a dry-land washing plant on Indian Creek during 1941-42.

The Oro Fino mine was located on the Mother Lode, one mile south of Garden Valley. From 1925-26 and in 1930, a four-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz was mined by way of an 80-foot inclined shaft. The ore, some of which was high-grade, was treated at Frog Pond mill.

A second Oro Fino mine, often referred to as the Oro Fino-Big Canyon mine was a lode gold mine four miles south of Shingle Springs in Big Canyon.

A third Oro Fino mine shows up as being five miles south of Diamond Springs on the Mother Lode. It may be the same mine as described above. By 1900 a vein 40 feet in width had been followed by a vertical shaft 200 feet deep which then turned at an angle of 40 degrees and then continued to a depth of 540 feet, still on the vein. A 30 stamp mill processed 85 tons of ore a day, producing about one-third free gold. Gold sulfides were processed in a chlorination plant at the rate of about four tons a day. The rock at this site was considered to be extremely hard and all work had to be done using air powered drills and “Judson No. 1″ powder. When the mine was visited by the State Mineralogist in 1900 it had been shut down.

The Oro Flam (Oriflamme) mine was a lode gold mine on 20 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile southeast of Diamond Springs. Here a vein of gold-bearing quartz, varying in width from one to ten feet, was developed by a 350-foot adit and a 40-foot shaft.

One mile south of Garden Valley, on the Mother Lode, was a lode gold mine known as the Oronogo mine. It was active from 1953-55 with only a small gold output. Here, two parallel veins of gold-bearing quartz were developed by a 90-foot inclined shaft with a 20-foot drift at the 90-foot level. If you analyze the name you will see that it is oro (gold in Spanish) and no go.

The Orum (Woodland) mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode three miles southeast of the townsite of El Dorado. It was active in 1914 when a one-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz as developed by a 200-foot vertical shaft with levels at 100 and 150 feet. The ore was treated in a five-stamp mill and concentrated on a Wilfley table. It was operated by the Orum Mining and Development Co.

The Overlook mine was a lode gold claim four miles northwest of Rescue, north of Deer Valley Road.

The O. W. Bowles mine was a placer claim one-half mile north of the town of  Newtown.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “P” (Part 1)

The Pacific Channel (Zimmerman) mine was a placer gold mine one-half mile west of Pacific House. From around 1915 through the early 1920s, an ancient channel of the South Fork of the American River, lying on granite bedrock and capped by andesite (a volcanic rock) was mined through several adits, one of which was 1000 feet in length.

From 1914-1918 the Pacific Dredging Company operated a floating bucket-line dredge with seven and one-half cubic foot buckets on the Middle Fork of the American River at Mammoth Bar.

The Pacific House mine was a tungsten mine located one mile west of Pacific House (between Pacific House and Pollock Pines) on the north bank of the American River. A deposit of scheelite (tungsten ore) was developed by an open cut.

Three miles northeast of Latrobe was the Pacific Minerals (Swift) mine, a soapstone mine. The property was originally worked prior to 1920 and again active during the early 1920s. Soapstone was originally mined underground by hand labor, using augurs and drills. The mined material was shipped to San Francisco where it was used for a coating in prepared roofing. In 1924, the mine caved and was shut down. In 1928 it was reopened with the mined soapstone being shipped by rail to grinding mills in the San Francisco area. Once processed, it was used in insecticides. From 1928 until the late 1930s, mining continued to take place underground. Access was by a 220-foot crosscut adit and several hundred feet of drifts. In the late 1930s, another cave-in occurred, this one in the central portion of the mine. From then on, the soapstone was mined from an open pit. By 1955, the main pit was 175 feet long, 35 to 70 feet wide and 75 feet deep at the face. There were also two other smaller pits at the north end of the deposit.

A company known as Pacific Minerals operated a slate mine five miles east of Diamond Springs.

The Pacific Quartz mine (See Placerville Gold Mining Co.)

The Pacific Seam mine was a seam gold mine two miles north of Georgetown in the Georgia Slide area of the eastern branch of the Mother Lode.

The Pack Horse Group mine was a lode gold mine, or group of mines, one mile south of Nashville.

The Padre mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode two miles north of Nashville. It was active around 1894 when a five foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 160 foot shaft. The ore was treated in a five-stamp mill.

The Panther mine was a lode gold claim one and one-half miles south of Georgetown on the eastern branch of the Mother Lode.

The Parlow Mill site was located on 4.78 acres two miles north of Grizzly Flat. There was probably a mine at this location, but only the mill site shows up in the records.

The Parnall Company had a lode gold mine six miles north of Grizzly Flat.

The Parson’s Seam mine was a seam gold mine two miles north of Georgetown in the Georgia Slide area.

The Paterson mine was a placer gold, drift mine two miles southeast of Indian Diggings, in the southern part of the county. It was active around 1935.

The Patterson mine was a placer mine on 30 acres one mile east of Volcanoville.

The Patterson Hill (also known as Patterson) mine was a placer gold mine on 17.16 acres two miles north of Georgetown.

The Patton mine was a placer gold mine in an isolated area one mile north of Pacific House.

The Paulson mine was a lode gold mine two miles north of Omo Ranch.
One mile south of Volcanoville (north east of Georgetown) was a group of lode gold claims owned by the Paymaster Group, the Paymaster mine being one of them. It was active in 1920 and 1926. The ore was treated on-site in a ten-ton Gibson mill.

The Payne mine was a placer gold, drift mine on 40 acres at Henry’s Diggings, three miles south of Grizzly Flat and two miles northeast of Omo Ranch. The deposit consisted of an ancient river channel, with a layer of gold-bearing gravel from 1 to 3 feet thick. It was active in 1894 and was worked intermittently after 1949 by I. H. Campion, of Somerset, who also mined the Irish Slide and Christian drift mines. It was developed by a single adit.

The Peacock mine was a placer gold mine one-half mile east of Omo Ranch.

The Pebble Hill mine was a placer gold mine on 57.35 acres two and one-half miles southwest of Camino on Chunk Creek.

The Pelton mine was a placer gold mine on 100 (70 in some records) acres one and one-half miles northeast of Shingle Springs.

The Pension mine was a placer gold mine on 17.58 acres three miles southeast of Latrobe on the Cosumnes River.

The Perkins mine was a lode gold mine on 61.89 acres one and one-half miles northwest of Volcanoville. Sometimes called the Perkins Location of the Perkins Consolidated Quartz mine, it was actually on both sides of the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Peter Watt mine was a placer gold mine on 160 acres nine miles east of Georgetown near Sand Mountain.

The Peterson mine was a lode gold mine on 17.76 acres of the Mother Lode one mile south of Kelsey.

The Pfeiffer mine was a chromite mine three miles east of Latrobe, west of Big Canyon Creek. Eighty tons of ore were removed when it was active in 1917, during World War I. It was later prospected in 1942, during World War II, when chromium again became a critical defense material. The deposit of northeast trending chromite pods were developed by open cuts.

The Philadelphia mine was a placer gold mine two and one-half miles northwest of Greenwood, adjacent to the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Philadelphia and Gold Note mine was a lode gold mine three miles southeast of Indian Diggings. Some 600 linear feet of a 4 to 5-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was worked by way of 125 and 145-foot shafts and a 600-foot adit. In addition to gold, the deposit also contained some galena (lead ore). The ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill.

There was a second Philadelphia and Gold Note mine, this one also a lode gold mine, one mile southeast of Omo Ranch.

The Philip Joiner and Black Hawk mine was a lode gold mine two and one-half miles north of Grizzly Flat.

One of the largest mines of any kind in El Dorado County was a chromite mine named the Pillikin mine, which was located six miles south of Pilot Hill, just north of Flagstaff Hill peak in the extreme western portion of the county. This mine, was a consolidation of the Pillikin, Bonanza King, Chrome Gulch, Donnelly, Nielson and Steel mines, contained the largest known chromite deposit in the Sierra Nevada. In fact, this one operation has been the source of more than three-quarters of the total amount of chromite produced in El Dorado County.
Because the deposit is large, with eleven chrome bearing areas in an area of around two square miles, chromite was discovered here early, around 1853, and by 1894 a few of the deposits had actually been worked. During World War I, the property was leased by the Noble Electric Steel Company, which produced considerable chromite which was shipped, in lump form, by rail from Folsom. By 1918 a small mill had been erected on-site to concentrate the ore for shipping, and two other companies, the Placer Chrome Company and the Steele Chrome Company, were also mining the deposits. The property was idle from 1918 until 1936 when U.S. Chrome Mines, Inc., acquired it. A 200 ton mill was installed and this company operated it until 1939 when the Rustless Mining Corporation leased and operated it for three years.
In 1944 the Pillikin Syndicate acquired the property and operated the mine. By 1945 the property had produced a total of 27,144 long tons (2200 pounds in a long ton) of chromite. From 1951 to 1953 the Allied Mining Company leased the property and erected a new mill. Unfortunately, they produced little ore and, in 1953, dismantled the mill and left.
In 1954 the Pillikin Mining Company mined the deposits and shipped the ore to the Pioneer-Lilyama copper mine, three miles east of Pilot Hill, where the mill had been modified to handle chromite. From there the concentrated ore was shipped to the government stockpile at Grants Pass, Oregon. The mine has been idle since April of 1955.
The deposit consists of lenses and bands of ore ranging in purity from less than one-half to more than 30 percent chromite over an area about one mile wide and four miles long. The mine was developed by open pits and it is estimated that there are at least 450,000 tons of material containing five percent or more chromite which can still be mined by the open pit method. An in-depth discussion of each of the deposits at this location can be found in “Mines and Mineral Resources of El Dorado County, California”, copies of which can be viewed in the “Rare Book” collection at the El Dorado County Main Library.

The Pilot Hill mine was a chromite mine just west of the summit of Pilot Hill. It was active in 1916 when 200 tons of ore was produced. This deposit was developed by open cuts.

From 1935-1936 the Pilot Hill Mining Company operated a dry-land dredge for gold in the Shingle Springs and Rescue areas.

The Pilot Knob Gold and Silver mine was a lode gold and silver mine two and one-half miles west of Rescue. There was also a separate mine at this location known as the Western Extension of the Pilot Knob Gold and Silver mine.

The Pine mine was a lode gold mine three miles east of Rescue.

Two and one-half miles north of Rescue was the Pine Hill (Unity) mine. A lode gold mine on 15.45 acres that contained a six-foot wide gold-bearing quartz vein. It was developed by a 200-foot shaft, drifts and crosscuts.

The Pine Ridge Hydraulic mine was a placer gold mine on 120 acres two miles southeast of Fair Play.

The Pink Lode mine wa a lode gold claim one mile southeast of Greenwood on the western branch of the Mother Lode.

The Pioneer mine was a placer gold mine one and one-half miles northwest of Camino.

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