Mines of El Dorado County

Mines of El Dorado County: “I”

The Ibid mine was a lode gold mine on 19.43 acres one and one-half miles southwest of Grizzly Flat.

Three miles south of the townsite of El Dorado was a long idle lode gold mine known as the Idaho mine. Nothing more has been reported on it.

The Ida Livingston mine was a lode gold mine on 13.81 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile north of Kelsey. The deposit consisted of a rich, 25-foot gold-bearing quartz vein that yielded up to $26 per ton of ore. It was mined prior to 1914 by way of  a 150-foot shaft.

The Idlewild or Taylor mine was a large, lode gold mine on the Mother Lode two miles northwest of Garden Valley. Originally worked in 1865, it was active again from the late 1880’s to about 1902. Some additional work was done at the mine during the years 1939-41. The vein of gold bearing quartz averaged 14 feet in width and produced $4 to $8 in gold per ton of ore. The mine was developed by a 1,225-foot inclined shaft with levels every 100 feet. Ore was crushed by a huge 40-stamp mill and the concentrates treated with cyanide. The estimated total output of the mine was one-million dollars.

The Ila was an isolated lode gold claim seven miles due east of Garden Valley.

The Independence mine was a lode gold mine two miles southwest of the townsite of El Dorado. The ore was found in pockets and was mined prior to 1914.

A second Independence mine was a lode gold mine four miles northwest of Slate Mountain and about five miles southeast of Georgetown. It was active in 1933, when the ore was treated in a two-stamp mill.

A third Independence mine was a lode gold mine on 2.19 acres of the Mother Lode one mile north of Placerville.

A fourth Independence mine was a lode gold mine on 18.34 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile northwest of Kelsey.

There were several locations in and around Indian Diggings where crystallized limestone deposits were found. These mines were collectively known at the Indian Diggings mines.

The Indian Creek mine was a placer mine located on 11.20 acres one and one-half miles west of Indian Diggings.

The Indian Creek Hill Hydraulic mine was a placer mine on 25 acres, just east of Gold Hill.

The Indian Diggings Creek placer gold mine was a hydraulic mine on Indian Creek, near the town of Indian Diggings. Consisting of an ancient, gold bearing river gravel channel on limestone bedrock, it was active around 1896. This mine and the Indian Creek mine listed above may be the same mine.

The Indicator mine was a lode gold mine seven miles west of Georgetown and three miles northwest of Greenwood, just south of the Middle Fork of the American River. It was operated together with two other lode gold mines, the SWH and Martha. The three were in a row, totaled 51.162 acres and were isolated from any other lode gold mines.

The Inez (Central) mine was a lode gold mine one mile east of Nashville, near today’s Highway 49 and the Amador County line. A gold-bearing quartz vein in slate, the deposit was actively mined around 1890 by means of a 250-foot shaft.

The Ingram Dredge was a dragline dredge used to work the gold bearing gravel deposit at Horseshoe Bar on the Middle Fork of the American River (Placer County line) in 1940-42.

The Ingrom (Ingram?)mine was a lode gold claim on the Mother Lode two miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Iowa mine was a lode gold mine on the east fork of the Mother Lode, one and one-half miles northeast of Georgetown.

The Iowa Tunnel mine was a placer mine on 60 acres one-half mile west of Newtown, two miles north of Pleasant Valley.

The Ira mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode, one-half mile southeast of Placerville.

The Irish Creek mine was a placer mine on 40 acres near Irish Creek, one mile south of Garden Valley.

The Irish Creek Falls mine was a placer mine on 160 acres near Irish Creek, about two miles south of Garden Valley. It surrounded several lode gold mines.

The Irish Creek Mining Company operated a non-floating gravel washing plant on Irish Creek near Georgetown, active in 1940.

The Irish mine was a chromite mine two and one-half miles east of Rescue. In 1918, 18 tons of ore was produced from small chromite pods and stringers that were developed by open cuts.

Two and one-half miles south of Grizzly Flat, at a place called Henry’s Diggings, was the Irish Slide placer gold mine. Here a drift mine was intermittently worked after 1949 in conjunction with two other drift mines, the Payne and Christian. The claim consisted of 20 acres.

The Irland (Ireland) mine was a copper mine three miles west of Placerville. Active in 1866 and 1906 when ore containing 2% copper, along with some gold and silver, was removed. The mine was developed by a 75-foot vertical shaft and an 18-foot drift.

Another copper mine, the Iron Crown (Bob) mine, was located one mile southeast of Georgetown. It was active prior to 1902 and again around 1908. The deposit consisted of a series of copper-bearing veins with slate and serpentine walls. Even the water in the mine was copper-bearing. The mine was developed by a 75-foot shaft and open cuts.

The Isaac Bradwell and P.M. Hong mine was a somewhat isolated lode gold claim on 40 acres one half mile northeast of the town of El Dorado.

The Isaac I. Holmes mine was a placer claim on 40 acres, one mile east of Placerville.

The Isabel (Isabella, Isabell) mine was a lode gold mine on 17.95 acres of the Mother Lode, about one-half mile southeast of Garden Valley. The deposit, a two to eight-foot gold-bearing quartz vein in slate, was developed by open cuts and a 30-foot shaft. The ore was first crushed on site using “arrastres” (picture a horse or mule attached to the end of a pivoted branch which drags a large rock in a circle, crushing ore as it goes in a circle). Later, ore was shipped to the Blue Lead mine’s 20-stamp mill, a short distance away. Another Isabella Mine and Mill site was located one mile west of Garden Valley. Whether the two were associated is unknown.

One-half mile northwest of Garden Valley was a lode gold mine named the Ivanhoe mine. The mine was active prior to 1890 and developed by open cuts and a 200-foot shaft.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “J” – “K”

The J. A. Mendes mine was a 48.68 acre placer mine one and one-half miles south of cool and west of Highway 49.

The Jacob C. Baughman mine was a 27.85 acre placer claim one mile south of Omo Ranch. It was part of a large group of similar claims in one area.

The James S. Kennedy mine was a 40 acre placer claim three and one-half miles northeast of Placerville.

The James Skinner, Jr. and Alex D. Skinner mine was a 160 acre placer claim two and one half miles west of Rescue, just to the north of Green Valley Road. The James Skinner, Jr. mine was a 140 acre adjacent placer claim. The Skinner winery was located at the intersection of Green Valley Road and Cameron Park Drive. Parts of it remain.

The Jap mine was a 20.34 acre lode gold mine on the west branch of the Mother Lode one-half mile south of Greenwood.

The Jay E. Russell mine was a 67.70 acre placer claim two miles east of Volcanoville.

The Jennings mine was a lode gold mine on 17.23 acres, two miles southeast of Kelsey between Rock Creek Rd. and the South Fork of the American River, just west of Rock Creek.

The Jerome and Guiseppi Tunzi mine was a 40 acre placer claim on Ringgold Creek, two miles east of Diamond Springs.

One and one-quarter miles east of Placerville was a placer gold mine called the Jerusalem mine. It was not much more than a gravel deposit prospected by hydraulicking in 1894.

The Jinkerson and Arditto mine was a drift, placer gold mine at Indian Diggings. Active in 1913-17 and in 1926, it was developed by and adit several hundred feet along an ancient river channel.

The Joerger mine was a chromite mine eight miles west of Shingle Springs. This mine was first worked during World War I, but most of the ore was removed in 1942. The exact tonnage of the removed ore is not known because it was combined with the output of other mines. Estimated ore reserves are 10,000 to 15,000 tons of 5 percent to 8 percent chromite in alternating rich and lean layers. In 1942 an open pit 150 feet long, 15 to 40 feet wide and 25 feet deep, produced ore averaging 8 percent chromite.

The John and James Blair mine was a 160 acre placer claim three miles east of Placerville just west of Chunk Creek. The John Blair mine was a placer claim adjacent to the south boundary of the City of Placerville as it existed in 1938. There was another James Blair claim of 160 acres on the north fork of Weber Creek, one and one-half miles south of Camino.

The John A. Holden mine was a 35 acre placer claim one and one-half miles east of Latrobe.

The John C. Andreason mine was a 160 acre placer claim one mile south of Indian Diggings.

The John C. Berry mines were a series of placer claims consisting of 160 acres all in the vicinity of Garden Valley.

The John H. Ferretta mine was a 60 acre placer claim one-half mile west of Newtown.

The John S. McClellan mine was a 160 acre placer claim on Camp Creek, two and one-half miles east of Pleasant Valley.

The John Steely mine was a placer claim on 80 acres adjacent to the Mother Lode, one-half mile north of Placerville.

The John W. Rupley mine was a 40 acre placer claim one mile east of Smith Flat.

The Johnson mine was a placer mine two miles northwest of Lotus near the South Fork of the American River.

The Jones (Good Luck) mine was a lode gold mine two miles south of Diamond Springs. it was active in 1915 and during 1922-23 when several thousand dollars of gold was produced. The deposit was developed by a shaft with levels at 75, 165 and 225 feet and several drifts.

Five miles northwest of Georgetown, at Jones Hill, was the Jones Hill placer mine. A gravel channel eight feet thick and 200 feet wide, over slate bedrock, was hydraulicked around 1892 and again in 1907.

The Joseph Immer mine was a 30 acre placer mine two miles northwest of Lotus and north of Highway 49.

The Joseph Skinner (Fisk, Porphyry) mine was a seam gold mine on the Mother Lode, one mile north of Placerville. It was active 1896-98, 1901-03 and around 1932, with a total output of nearly $100,000. Consisting of thin quartz seams and small quartz bunches it was originally worked by hydraulicking and later by a crosscut 90 feet deep at the face, running west 232 feet, with drifts. Most of the gold was specimen gold, taken from pockets and kept intact, although small lots were milled.

The Joseph Snow and Co. mine was a placer mine consisting of 160 acres on the North Fork of Weber Creek, one mile south of Camino. This should not be confused with the nearby Snow Consolidated placer mine that is still in operation as rock quarry.

The Josephine mine was located at the town of Volcanoville. It was a six-foot vein of lode gold in slate and serpentine developed by five drift adits, actively mined in 1889-90, 1896, 1920, and 1934-35. The ore was treated in a 20-stamp mill.

There was also a Josephine placer mine on 43.54 acres of land near Volcanoville.

The Josh Billings mine was a lode gold mine on 20.43 acres of the west branch of the Mother Lode one and one-half miles northwest of Garden Valley.

The Juckes placer mine was located on 40 acres, two and one-half miles south of Latrobe on the Cosumnes River.

The Julia Beard mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode two and one-half miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Kates (Norris) mine was a placer gold mine located one and one-half miles east of Volcanoville. It was active prior to 1894 and again in 1896, when it was prospected by the Two Channel Mining Company, a company involved in a number of placer gold mines. This ancient river gravel deposit was originally hydraulicked and later developed by a 250-foot bedrock adit and several drifts. The cemented gravel was treated in a stamp mill.

The Katherine mine was a lode gold claim on the Mother Lode, two miles south of Diamond Springs.

The Keegan mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode in the City of Placerville.

The Kelly mine was a chromite mine active around 1918. It was located just east of Rattlesnake Bridge and, during World War I, 25 tons of ore was produced, containing 28 percent chromite. Like many other early mines in the area, it is now under Folsom Lake.

Another Kelly mine was an early lode gold mine, located on the Mother Lode just east of the town of Kelsey. It was later renamed the Dalmatia. Numerous quartz seams and a quartz vein were found in a zone that varied in width from 20 to 50-feet, which were worked in the 1880’s, 1890-94 and again around 1935. A two-foot vein assayed at $16 per ton, a single pocket yielded $14,000 and the seams yielded around $2 to $3 per ton. The mine was originally worked in an open cut some 500 feet long and later was developed by a 200-foot inclined shaft and a 1200-foot adit. The ore was treated on site in a 10-stamp mill.

A third Kelly mine was a lode gold mine located on the Mother Lode one-half mile north of Kelsey. On the Kelly Ranch and owned by Miss Margaret Kelley, the deposit consisted of a six-foot wide vein of gold bearing quartz in Mariposa slate. It was active around 1902 and 1932 and developed by two 50-foot shafts, 150 feet apart.

The Kelsey Gold and Silver (Lady) mine was a lode gold mine on 41.67 acres of the Mother Lode about one mile south of Kelsey. Originally worked prior to 1915, it was reopened in 1926 and a mill erected that year when the Kelsey Mining Company was formed. The Kelsey Mining Company operated it until 1931, when it again closed. In 1934 the mine was reopened and operated until 1941. The ore, which was found in narrow bands of quartz, contained free gold, pyrite and some galena (lead ore). During the years 1928-1931 15,000 tons of ore was crushed that yielded from $1.80 to $6.40 per ton. It was developed by a main 1700-foot north drift adit and a 700-foot north drift adit about 300 feet above the main adit. These two adits were connected by a raise and there were several crosscuts. There was also a 42-foot shaft near the main adit portal (opening). Originally the ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill, which was later replaced by a Telsmith gyratory crusher and an Aurora jaw crusher. About 40 tons of ore per day were processed at the mine.

The Kenna mine was a placer gold mine one mile northeast of Kentucky Flat, several miles east of Georgetown and about two miles east of Volcanoville. It was active up until 1896 when it was operated by the Two Channel Mining Company. Some additional work was done as late as 1922. The two gold bearing gravel channels were worked by different means, the Main or White channel was hydraulicked and the Blue channel developed by a 1500-foot adit. The coarse gold was held in well cemented gravel that was treated in a 10-stamp mill.

The Kennebec Bar mine was a placer mine on the Middle Fork of the American River about two miles northeast of the town of Cool.

The Kentucky Flat mine was located at Kentucky Flat, about two miles southeast of Volcanoville. It was later known as the Kentucky Flat Consolidated placer mine and consisted of 674.30 acres on two different ancient riverbed channels. The mine was active in 1894-1902 and again in 1933. It was another mine operated by the aptly named Two Channel Mining Company. As with the Kenna Mine, the Main or White channel was hydraulicked – this time in a pit with a 25-foot bank – and the Blue channel developed by a 625-foot adit and an 80-foot shaft.

The Keystone mine was a lode gold mine on 8.63 acres of the Mother Lode about one-half mine northwest of Placerville.

Near Georgetown, during the years 1947 and 1948, the Knight Placer Mining Company operated a dragline dredge to remove placer gold from various gravel deposits.

Three miles northeast to Georgetown on Little Bald Mountain was a chromite mine known as the Knoff (Austin) mine. The mine was active twice: in 1918 when 400 tons of ore were mined and again in 1942-44 when 79 tons were mined. The deposit consisted of pods and lenses of chromite in sheared serpentine that was developed by open cuts and shallow shafts.

The Kumfa or Kum Fa mine was a placer gold drift mine at Smith Flat. It was Active from 1911-13 and also in 1928 and 1936. The ancient river gravel deposit was developed by a 631-foot inclined shaft. It was worked in conjunction with the nearby Carpender mine.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “L”

The  Lady mine was a lode gold mine on 11.97 acres of the Mother Lode one mile south of Kelsey.

The Lady Blanche mine was a lode gold mine three and one-half miles east of Fair Play. The deposit consisted of a 1 to 4-foot wide gold-bearing quartz vein that was developed by two adits, 180 feet and 80 feet in length. The mine was active in 1896.

The Lady Edner mine was a placer gold mine located one-half mile northwest of Omo Ranch.

The Lady Emma (Currie) mine was a lode gold mine one mile east of Kelsey. It was active around 1896 and later prospected in 1942 and 1947. The 4-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 300-foot inclined shaft and a 150-foot vertical shaft with drifts and crosscuts. Once removed, the ore was treated on-site in a 10-stamp mill.

The Lady Jane mine was a placer gold claim just north of Chiquita, three miles southeast of Volcanoville.

The Laicey mine was a chromite mine one and three-quarters miles west of Garden Valley. The deposit consisted of small chromite pods in serpentine and talc. It was developed by open cuts.

The La Moille, Ophir mine was a lode gold mine located on 11.10 acres two and a half miles directly south of the town of El Dorado. It was active prior to 1896 when several gold-bearing quartz seams were prospected.

The Landecker (Hope) mine was a placer gold drift mine one and one-half miles southeast of Placerville. It was active in the early 1900’s and later in 1925 and 1935.

With a similarly spelled name, one of El Dorado County’s several slate mines, this one located near Kelsey, was the Landeker mine. It was active in the 1880s when roofing slate was produced.

One mile east of Diamond Springs on the Mother Lode was the Larkin mine, a lode gold mine that was also mined for copper and other minerals. The deposit consisted of two distinct veins of gold-bearing quartz, the west one being explored by a vertical shaft and the east one reached by crosscut from the 250-foot level. In 1896 the a 250-foot vertical shaft was sunk and the ore treated in a five-stamp mill. By 1900 the shaft had been extended to 600 feet and the mill expanded to ten stamps. In 1903 the shaft was extended to 800 feet and then the mine was shut down. In 1918 it was reopened and some copper ore was produced. The total production for the mine is estimated to be $125,000. The deposit consisted of several gold-bearing quartz veins, the largest ranging in width from 4 to 12 feet. In addition to the gold, some of the veins contained pyrite, chalcopyrite and malachite (both ores of copper) and as much as 10% copper. Dolomite (similar to limestone, but containing more magnesium) was also mined here.

The Last Chance mine was a lode gold mine one mile south of Volcanoville. It was active in 1896 and developed by a 50-foot vertical shaft and a 400-foot crosscut adit. The ore removed from its 5-foot wide gold-bearing quartz vein was treated in a 4-stamp mill.

At Henry’s Diggings, two miles northeast of Omo Ranch, in the southern part of El Dorado County, was another Last Chance mine, this one a placer gold mine. Other than being a 40 acre claim, little more in known about this mine since it has been idle so long nobody could determine when it was actually active.

A third Last Chance mine was a placer gold mine on 54.15 acres one mile south of Smith Flat.

A fourth Last Chance mine was a lode gold mine on 20.66 acres one-half mile north of Coloma near Mt. Murphy.

The Last Hope mine was a placer gold mine located one mile south of Omo Ranch and one mile northwest of Indian Diggings.

The Last Resort mine was a placer gold mine on 20 acres, one mile west of Indian Diggings.

One of several mines with the name Latrobe was a lode gold mine one and one-half miles east of Latrobe.

The Lattimore mine was a lode gold mine three miles northwest of Greenwood, on the west branch of the Mother Lode just south of the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Lava Hill mine was a placer gold mine located about two miles southeast of Camino, near Weber Creek.

The  Leahey and Riley mine was a placer gold mine on 8.88 acres, one mile south of Rescue.

The Le Bouf and England mine was a lode gold mine on 20.67 acres of the east branch of the Mother Lode, one and a half miles north of Georgetown.

During the years 1939-40 the Lemroh Mining Company, based in San Francisco, operated a dragline dredge at various gravel deposits in the county.

The Leslie Hydraulic mine was a placer gold mine on 40.00 acres one mile east of Camino.

The Levenson mine was a hydraulic, placer gold mine, one mile southeast of the town of Fair Play. It was active around 1896 when a 50-foot bank of ancient river gravel was mined. The gravel was then run through 120 feet of sluices to separate out the gold.

The Levi Rosier mine was a placer gold claim on 80.00 acres, two and a half miles northeast of Placerville just south of the South Fork of the American River.

There were two Levitt mines, both of which were lode gold mines on the Mother Lode. One was one  mile south of Kelsey and the other two miles south of Kelsey. Later information shows a Levitt Consolidated lode gold mine on 37.97 acres of the Mother Lode, one and a half miles southeast of Kelsey, which probably includes both of these mines.

The Lilly Placer mine was a placer gold mine on 30.00 acres one mile north of Garden Valley on or very near Empire Creek.

The Lincoln mine was a seam gold mine located one mile northwest of Georgetown that was active in 1896 and again in 1926. The thin seams of gold bearing quartz were located in a belt 300 feet wide what was developed by a 100-foot open cut and three adits, 150, 110 and 60 feet in length. Once the ore was removed and treated, it was run through some 900 feet of sluices.

The Lincoln Placer mine was a placer gold mine on 20.00 acres two and a half miles northeast of Smith Flat on South Canyon Creek.

In 1937 the Lincoln Gold Dredging Company operated a dragline dredge at one or more unidentified gravel deposits in the county.

In Cedar Ravine, one and one-half miles southeast of Placerville, was the Linden mine, a placer gold mine. During the years 1882-94, 40,000 cubic yards of gravel was processed, yielding $130,000 in gold. A portion of the gold-bearing ancient river channel, known as the Deep Blue Lead channel, was developed by a 4000-foot adit with numerous drifts and two shafts. The cemented gravel was treated in a 10-stamp mill.

The Lion mine was a lode gold mine on 12.17 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile northwest of Placerville.

The Little Big Hole mine was a placer gold mine on the Middle Fork of the Cosumnes River, five miles northeast of Fair Play. It was active in 1926 when the river was diverted and a 250-foot adit was driven into the gravel. It was also active in the late 1970s when a mining company attempted to mine gold by removing the gravel from the “Big Hole” in the river.

On Canyon Creek, two miles north of Georgetown was the Little Chief mine. A seam gold mine active in 1894, it was developed by 130-foot and 240-foot adits. The ore was treated in a one-stamp mill. There was also a placer gold mine of the same name on 90 acres at the same location.

Another Little Chief mine, this one a placer mine, was located on a tributary of Otter Creek, four miles north of Georgetown near Bottle Hill.

The Little Giant mine was a lode gold mine on about 20 acres one mile west of the town of El Dorado.

The Live Oak mine was a small lode gold mine one mile east of Diamond Springs. It was active prior to 1896 when it was developed by a 30-foot shaft. There was also a Live Oak placer gold mine with an undetermined location due to printing errors on a map.

Five miles south of Shingle Springs was a lode gold mine known as the Log Cabin (Darrow) mine. Located on 15.205 acres near Mt. Aigare, it was active in 1894-96, when a 2 to 16-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 600-foot crosscut adit, numerous drifts and a 30-foot shaft. The ore was treated on-site in a five-stamp mill.

On 11.713 acres of the west branch of the  Mother Lode, one mile northwest of Garden Valley, was a lode gold mine know as the Lone Jack mine. A vein of gold-bearing quartz, up to 24 feet in width, was developed by a 400-foot shaft. The ore, which contained $6 of gold per ton, was treated in a 10-stamp mill.

One mile southeast of Nashville, near the Cosumnes River, was the Lone Star mine, a lode gold mine. Located on 19.68 acres of the Mother Lode, it had a seven-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz that was developed by a 100-foot shaft and a 100-foot drift around 1894.

Another Lone Star mine was located two miles (one mile in some descriptions) southeast of Diamond Springs. Also a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode, it was active in 1894-96 and again in 1907-08 when a two to five-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 500-foot crosscut adit.

A third Lone Star mine was also a lode gold mine located on the Mother Lode, three miles south of the town of El Dorado.

The Lone Star Tunnel and Hydraulic mine was a placer gold mine consisting of 100.00 acres three miles east of Smith Flat.

The appropriately named Longshot mine was a small copper mine located one mile west of the Cosumnes copper mine, which was four miles north of Fair Play, near the Cosumnes River. It was developed by a 200-foot adit, but only worked intermittently, more as a prospect than a real mine.

The Lookout mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode, some three miles southwest of El Dorado and one-half mile south of the Union mine. It was intermittently active from 1860 through the 1930s. The gold was found in small, but rich ore shoots that were developed by a 400-foot adit which was later extended to over 600 feet. The mine produced $2,200 in 1912 and $15,000 in 1933 when a strike was made in the roof of the adit, where a raise was started 520 feet from the portal and 270 feet below the surface.

The Lookout and K.K. mine was a lode gold mine in Quartz Canyon, near Volcanoville, northeast of Georgetown. It was active in 1894-96 when a two-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 200-foot crosscut adit, several drifts and a 34-foot inclined shaft.

In 1949 and 1950, a company known as Lord and Bishop operated a three cubic yard dragline dredge on Greenwood and Carson Creeks.

The Lords Consolidated mine was a lode gold mine consisting of a group of four claims totaling 72.47 acres three miles east of Diamond Springs.

The Losh mine was a slate mine located one-half mile north of Chili Bar. During the years 1890, 1921-24 and 1937, dimension slate (blackboards, table tops, paving stones, etc.) was produced from an open pit 50 feet deep and 40 feet wide.

On the South Fork of the American River, at the town of Lotus, was a gravel mining operation known as the Lotus Bar mine. During the 1930s the gravel was mined using power shovels and bulldozers. The placer gold was separated from the rest of the material by sending the gravel through several washing plants.

Three miles south of the town of El Dorado was a lode gold mine known as the Loveless mine. The deposit consisted of a one-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz with pockets of rich ore. It was active in 1914 and developed by a 160-foot crosscut adit, 300-foot drift and a 90-foot shaft.

The Lucero mine was a lode gold mine on the western branch of the Mother Lode one mile southwest of Georgetown.

The Lucinda mine was a lode gold mine three miles west of Grizzly Flat. It was active prior to 1896 when its six-inch to three-foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 50-foot vertical shaft and a 150-foot crosscut adit.

The Lucky Boy mine was a lode gold claim on the Mother Lode, three miles southeast of the town of El Dorado.

The Lucky Five mine was a lode gold claim on the west branch of the Mother Lode near Spanish Dry Diggings.

Two miles south of the townsite of El Dorado was the Lucky Jack mine, another lode gold mine. The deposit consisted of a series of gold-bearing quartz veins that were developed by several shallow shafts. The ore was treated on-site in a two-stamp mill.

The Lucky Marion (Shepard) mine was a lode gold mine located on 20 acres of the western branch of the Mother Lode one mile northwest of Greenwood. It was first active in 1896-97 and again in 1901, when it produced $3,860 in gold. From 1897 until September 1899 it was shut down on account of litigation. The “high-grade” gold-bearing quartz vein, 18 to 24 inches in width, was developed by a 112-foot inclined shaft with several drifts at the 100-foot level. The ore was treated in a 20-stamp mill.

The Lucky Star Consolidated mine was a group of claims on 14.84 acres of the Mother Lode one-half mile north of Placerville.

The Lucky Strike mine was a lode gold claim two miles southeast of Placerville.

A second Lucky Strike mine was also a lode gold claim just north of Greenwood on the western branch of the Mother Lode.

The Lukens mine was a lode gold mine three miles southwest of the town of Cool. The deposit consisted of a narrow vein of high grade ore that was developed and worked around 1923 through two shafts, one 130 feet and the other 90 feet in depth, connected by a 150-foot drift.

The Lyon mine was a placer gold, drift mine, one mile southeast of Smith’s Flat and two miles east of Placerville. As at the Linden Mine, a portion of the Deep Blue Lead channel was worked, however, here it was by two shafts and drifts. It was active prior to 1900 with a total output of $1,400,000.

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Mines of El Dorado County: “M” (Part 1)

The Madelina, Madeline and Magdalena mines were three copper mines five miles south of Diamond Springs. The were operated together, prior to 1900, under the name Blue Cat mine. Since this was on the Mother Lode, the Madelina was also a lode gold mine. It was worked by a cross-cut tunnel 90 feet into the vein, and a drift along the foot-wall 100 feet, connected by a raise 105 feet to the surface.

Two miles northwest of Garden Valley was a lode gold mine known as the Madrona mine. It was first active prior to 1894 when a vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 40-foot shaft. Later maps show the Madrone group at this location operating claims for both lode and placer gold on and near the east branch of the Mother Lode.

The Maginess Group operated a lode gold mine near Nashville on the Mother Lode.

The Malone mine was a placer gold mine on 5.22 acres one mile west of Indian Diggings.

The Maltby mine was a lode gold mine on 20.62 acres of the west branch of the Mother Lode, one and one-half miles southeast of Greenwood and just north of the Argonaut mine. During the 1930s the deposit was prospected through an adit of unknown length.

The Mameluke (Mameluke Hill) mine was a seam gold mine located one mile north of Georgetown on 16.68 acres of the east branch of the Mother Lode. It was active prior to 1880 with a total output of not less than two million dollars in gold. It contained coarse gold that was recovered from alluvium and thin seams of quartz in slate.

The Mammoth (Mammoth No. 1 and No. 2) mine was a lode gold mine one mile northwest of Deer Valley School, which was located on Deer Valley Road just to the north of the Jayhawk Cemetery. This 22.23 acre mine was opened in 1860 when a pocket of rich quartz produced some $10,000 in gold. The mine was effectively idle until 1934 when the tailings dump was reworked. The deposit consisted of a five foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz and a second vein three to four feet wide. It was developed by a 75-foot crosscut adit and a 120-foot drift. The ore, once removed, was treated in a ten-stamp mill.

The Mammoth Bar River mine was actually two placer gold mines consisting of 38.41 acres two miles north of Cool on the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Manhattan Location of the Perkins Consolidated mine was a lode gold mine consisting of 61.89 acres of land one and one-half miles northwest of Volcanoville very near the Middle Fork of the American River.

The Manhattan Consolidated (Manhattan-California) mine was a lode gold mine on 76,86 acres of the Mother Lode two miles northeast of Nashville. This deposit was active prior to 1915 and further prospected in 1935, 1947 and 1952. It was developed by a 400-foot shaft.

The Manzanita mine was a lode gold mine on 16.82 acres of the Mother Lode, one mile south of Kelsey. It was active in 1918.

The Manzanita Queen Consolidated mine was a lode gold mine one-half mile southeast of Diamond Springs on 82.21 acres. It was an extension of the Griffith Consolidated Mine.

The Maple Leaf (Blakely) mine was a placer gold mine located two miles west of Camino near Five Mile House. Originally active in the 1880’s, it was reopened from 1932 to 1935 when it was operated as a relief project, employing 100 men. During this period, about $20,000 in gold was produced by hydraulicking and sluicing.

The Marble Valley (Schwalin) mine was a large limestone mine two miles east of Clarksville in Marble Valley. This deposit, which contained 98.80 percent pure calcium carbonate, was originally quarried and then burned in a nearby vertical kiln for the cement industry. Much later, the limestone was mined by the El Dorado Limestone Company and later Gallo Glass Company. The total extent of the deposit is unknown but the limestone outcrops for a distance of nearly 4000 feet, with a width from less than 100 feet to 200 feet. It was developed by two open quarries, one of which has filled with water. The mine is closed and the land is being converted to subdivision with custom home lots.

Just to the southeast of the Marble Valley limestone mine was a lode gold mine also know as the Marble Valley mine. It consisted of about 15 acres of land.

The Marcelais mine was a lode gold mine three miles east of Shingle Springs and south of Mother Lode Drive.

The Margareth mine was a lode gold mine two and one-half miles northeast of Nashville on 20 acres of the Mother Lode.

One mile east of Diamond Springs was the Marguerite mine, a lode gold mine on 18.92 acres of the Mother Lode. Here, three parallel veins of gold-bearing quartz were developed by a 300-foot vertical shaft, 200-foot adit and 1200 feet of drifts.

The Marigold mine was a lode gold mine one half mile northwest of Garden Valley on the west branch of the Mother Lode.

The Marshall group worked a lode gold claim about three miles north of Grizzly Flat and north of the North Fork of the Cosumnes River.

The Marshall and Estes placer gold mine was on 50 acres near Caldor, the eastern terminus of the California Door Company (Caldor) railroad, which is about six miles east of Grizzly Flat. The western terminus of the railroad was in Diamond Springs.

The Martha L mine was a lode gold mine two and one-half miles northeast of Cool and just south of the Middle Fork of the American River. It was worked together with two other mines, the three consisting of a total of 51.62 acres.

The Martin mine was an isolated lode gold mine, three and one-half miles northeast of Garden Valley near Bear Creek.

The Martin Arenz mine was a placer gold claim on ten acres two miles southwest of Rescue, adjacent to Deer Creek.

The Martinez (Hillside group) mine was a lode gold mine consisting of five different mines on 96.290 acres near Martinez Creek (a tributary of the Cosumnes River), south of the Union Mine some four and one-half miles southeast of the townsite of El Dorado. The mine was operated by the Hillside Gold Mining Company in 1915. It was again worked around 1926 when an adit was run 900 feet into the lower part of the hill and and later in the early 1930s. In 1937 some development work was done in the lower workings of the mine, with some ore production. The deposit consisted of a series of parallel gold-bearing quartz veins and was developed by a 600-foot adit driven west with numerous raises and drifts. South of this adit is another 600-foot crosscut adit and some older workings. The ore was treated on-site by a five-stamp mill.

Another Martinez mine was a manganese mine three miles southeast of the townsite of El Dorado, near the Martinez gold mine. Here, the operator of the mine, the Martinez Gold Mines Company, developed two lenses containing rhodonite and black manganese oxide.

The Maryland mine was a lode gold mine on 19.24 acres directly south of Placerville on the Mother Lode.

The Massinni mine was a placer mine on 20 acres one mile west of Newtown.
One mile south of Diamond Springs was the Mathenas Creek (Schneider) Mine. A lode gold mine, it was active between 1888 and 1894 when a two to eight foot vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by 100 and 300-foot adits. The ore was treated in a Huntington mill.

On the American River near Coloma a Lotus resident, E. B. Matherly, operated a suction dredge called the Matherly Dredge, from 1947 to 1952.

Mauk and Kendall operated a placer gold mine on 180 acres about five miles east of Grizzly Flat near Dogtown Creek.

The Mauner mine was a placer gold mine on 30 acres one half mile northwest of Greenwood.

The May Morton mine was a placer gold mine on 20 acres two miles south of Smith Flat.

At an unknown area or areas in El Dorado County J.W.S. Butler, from Sacramento, operated the McCoy and Butler Dredge, a dry land dredge, in 1941.

Two miles north of the town of Coloma was a chromite mine known as the McCurdy mine. In 1918 200 tons of ore containing 36 percent chromite was produced. The deposit consisted of two groups of chromite lenses in serpentine and talc that were developed by both open cuts and a 45-foot shaft.

The McDonald and Buys mine was a chromite mine one mile south of Four Corners (the intersection of Gold Hill Road and Lotus Road). This mine was also active in 1918 when 350 tons of ore was produced. The pods of chromite at this location were developed by three shafts and an open pit.

The McDonald and Channel mine was a placer gold mine on 50 acres just southeast of Placerville.

The McDowell and Wiltshire mining company operated two locations (the McDowell location and the Wiltshire location) one mile northeast of Nashville on the Mother Lode.

Near Henry’s Diggings, in the south part of our county, was a placer gold, drift mine known as the McKim Mine. It was prospected in 1926 when a 100-foot adit and 20- foot raise were driven.

The McKinley mine was a lode gold mine just to the west of Spanish Dry Diggings on the west branch of the Mother Lode.

The McKinley Goldstandard mine was a lode gold mine on 19.18 acres one half mile north of Placerville on the Mother Lode.

The McLellan mine was a placer gold mine on 60 acres one and one-half mile southeast of Salmon Falls.

The McNulty (Golden Gate, Oakland) Mine was a lode gold mine on the Mother Lode three miles south of the townsite of El Dorado. Here a six foot wide vein of gold-bearing quartz was developed by a 400-foot shaft, 450-foot crosscut adit and a 450-foot winze sunk from the adit. The ore was treated in a ten-stamp mill.

Two gentlemen from Weaverville, Messrs McQueen and Downing, operated a dragline dredge on Carson creek in 1940.

In 1949, near Cherokee Bar on the American River, the Mead Company, from San Francisco, operated a dragline dredge.

The Meder mine was a lode gold mine consisting of 19.09 acres adjacent to Green Valley Road at the north end of today’s Cameron Park. It also shows up in some records as a placer gold mine at this same location.

Another Meder mine was a lode gold mine consisting of 18.18 acres two miles southeast of Shingle Springs.

The Melton Group operated a lodge gold mine two miles northeast of Grizzly Flat.

The Mexican Gold mine was a lode gold mine on 20 acres one and one-half miles southeast of Fair Play.

The Michael B. Ryan mine was a 20 acre lode gold claim two miles southeast of Shingle Springs.

The Michael Sweeney mine was a placer gold mine on 80 acres one and one-half miles south of Coloma in the Gold Hill area.

The Michigan mine was a placer gold mine consisting of 120 acres two miles east of Fair Play in Slug Gulch.

The Mierson Group operated several gold mines one-half mile northwest of Placerville on the Mother Lode. Totaling 53.43 acres they were called the Vitmer location, Wellington location, Sherman location and Grant location.

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