Mines of El Dorado County: “F”

The Fair Play (California Mohawk) mine was a placer gold, drift mine just to the east of the town of Fair Play, which is located in the southern part of El Dorado County. When it was active is unknown, however, it is known that at one time it was owned by the California Mohawk Mining Company.

The Fair Play Hill placer mine was located on 40 acres one mile southeast of Fair Play.

The Fairweather mine was a placer mine about one-half mile west of Cool.

One Falls mine consisted of 14 acres on the Mother Lode two miles south of Diamond Springs. In 1914 and again around 1934, a gold bearing quartz vein was developed by a 235-foot crosscut adit.

Another Falls mine was a placer mine consisting of 30 acres on Weber Creek, one mile south of Gold Hill.

The Faraday lode mine consisted of 16 acres on the Mother Lode one mile south of Placerville.

The Ferriera mine was the name of a placer gold mine one mile south of Newtown, near Pleasant Valley. It was prospected, and perhaps mined, in 1930 when a 135-foot shaft was sunk in search of gold bearing gravel.

Fink and Co. Was the name of a placer mine on 80 acres in Pleasant Valley.

The Flagstaff mine was a lode gold mine located a “few miles” north of Grizzly Flat that was active around 1888. Ore from the mine was treated on site in a 10-stamp mill.

Fleishhacker appears to be the name of mines at several locations along the South Fork of the American River. The locations are reported to have been in at least six different sections of land, from just upstream of Salmon Falls to the Coloma area.

The Flink was a lode gold mine two miles south of Georgetown on the eastern branch of the Mother Lode.

The Flynn was a placer mine located between Georgia Slide and Bottle Hill, north of Georgetown.

The Forni mine was a chromite mine located four miles east of Latrobe, most likely on the Forni Ranch. Like many other chromite mines in El Dorado County, it was only mined early in the 20th century, when chrome was needed for the war effort. The only records known indicate that during the year 1918, 1 ton of ore was produced.

The Fort Jim Consolidated mine was a placer drift mine on 40 acres, four miles southeast of Placerville near Weber Creek and Newtown. It was only active for a short period, from 1913 – 1915.

Fort Yuma was the name of a lode gold mine on Big Canyon Creek, two miles northeast of Brandon Corner (east of Latrobe) and four miles south of Shingle Springs. Active from 1890-1902 and again in 1938, this 2 to 4-foot vein of gold bearing quartz in Calaveras slate was developed by a 175 and 40-foot shafts and drifts.

The Fortuna Consolidated quartz mine was a lode gold mine on 63 acres of the Mother Lode one mile north east of Placerville. It consisted of five different mining locations, the Belle, Jackson, Logan, Fortuna and Brighton.

The Fossati (Tunnel) mine was a drift mine one and one-half miles south of Camino. It was active intermittently in 1930-36 when two channels of the ancient (Tertiary) South Fork of the American River, the lower being 25 to 200 feet wide, were developed by numerous adits and raises.

The Fraction quartz mine consisted of 5.57 acres on the Mother Lode, just north of Weber Creek and two miles South of Placerville.

The Francis Adams was a lode gold mine on 17 acres of the Mother Lode two miles south of Kelsey, near the South Fork of the American River.

The Francis M. McCommas placer claim consisted of 20 acres on Camp Creek, one mile south of Pleasant Valley.

Two and one-half miles northeast of Placerville was the Franklin (Tockey) mine, a placer gold drift mine on 80 acres that was active around 1896 and again in 1907. On a Tertiary channel of the South Fork of the American River, it was developed by a 1400-foot drift in the channel. The gold bearing gravel, once removed, was treated in a 10-stamp mill and then run through a 100-foot sluice.

The Frederick Bendfeldt claim was a placer claim consisting of 80 acres on and near Hangtown Creek at Smith Flat.

The Freeman mine was a chromite mine four miles southeast of Latrobe. In 1918, 40 tons of ore was removed from a chromite lens in serpentine by means of an open cut.

The Fred Irwin was the name of a placer mine two miles south of Kelsey, near the South Fork of the American River.

The Fremont Tunnel was the name of a placer mine on 40 acres northeast of Smith Flat.

The French (Nagler) mine was a seam gold mine just west of the town of Greenwood. Active prior to 1874 and again during the 1890s, it produced more than a half-million dollars in gold. The zone of quartz seams was up to 200 feet wide and worked by two methods: hydraulicking in a pit 80 feet deep and 600 feet long, and a shallow shaft. A second French mine was a placer mine consisting of 20 acres on Sapiago Creek, three miles southeast of Omo Ranch.

A gold dredge known as the French Corral Dredge operated a dragline at Brown’s Bar on the Middle Fork of the American River in 1946. This area, the boundary between El Dorado and Placer County, was very rich and heavily mined during the early days of the Gold Rush.

The French Creek mine was located three and one-half miles northeast of Latrobe. Opened in 1953, it was one of the newer lode gold mines in El Dorado County. By 1956, the latest information we have on this mine, a 30-foot inclined shaft had been developed. The ore body, which averaged 20 feet in width and extended for some 300 feet, contained both free gold and auriferous (gold containing) pyrite. The ore assay varied widely, from $2.80 to $60 of gold per ton, averaging $20 to $30.

One mile southwest of Spanish Dry Diggings was a seam gold mine know as the French Hill mine. Active around 1894, it was mined in open cuts and the material treated first in a 10-stamp mill and then in an 800-foot sluice. It was also developed by a 100-foot shaft and a 100-foot adit. At one time the property was also prospected for asbestos, but no records exist of any significant mining of that material that might have occurred.

The French Ravine hydraulic claim consisted of 90 acres on the South Fork of Weber Creek, just north of Newtown.

The curiously named Frog Pond and Marigold Consolidated mine was a lode gold mine one-half mile northwest of Garden Valley. Active intermittently from 1914-1927, it was developed by a 60-foot shaft and several drifts. The ore was treated on-site in a 2-stamp mill.

The Funny Bug (Pendelco) mine was a lode gold mine located one mile southwest of Gold Hill, on the north bank of Weber Creek. It was active intermittently from 1928 to 1942 when small amounts of both gold and copper were removed, and ores of lead and other metals were detected. In 1953 the property was leased to Carl Howe, of Placerville, who did some rehabilitation and surface work. The mine was developed by crosscuts on two levels from a 200-foot shaft.

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